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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
say it's about environment. they want to limit sprawl. >> to encourage growth to the areas it makes the most sense. >> reporter: justin's grand father started their farm in the '20s with two horses and a plow. >> there was a rush of people that wanted to be grandfathered in before the first of the year and now they've actually. this bill has caused more land to be developed than would otherwise been developed if they hadn't done anything at all. every year that goes pasted and the more regulations, the more attractive other places are. they are hoping the bill will make it to the floor. in annapolis, don harrison, abc2 news. >> all right. sunset days get longer, have nice sunshine. 48 at bwi. wind has gone calm. we had peak wind gusts over 20. they were mild gusts out of the southwest. temperatures now still low 50s in dulles, upper 40s in ball. ocean city reporting 42. so that's not bad at all. how about some neighborhood weather. i think you'll find temperatures through the middle part of the day. as clouds increase you'll reach the mid-40s at least in the baltimore city area. as
workplace wellness and creating healthy environment. the million hearts initiative has a goal to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes in a five-year period. >>> and to push an implement the affordable health care act in our state it continues in annapolis today. lawmakers are debating legislation that merges the federal reform laws into the state's health care system. anthony brown is testifying in favor of it. the measure includes expanding medicaid, and it creates a dedicated funding stream for the maryland health benefit exchange from the existing premium tax on health ensureers. >>> time for five -- insooners. >>> -- did insurers. >>> time for five things to know. >> reporter: the president will speak at a factory in north carolina. >> a new study finds that more than-- >>> a new study finds more than 4 out of 10 of us are living paycheck to paycheck and more than 1 in 10 don't make enough to pay for essential it's a combination of the soft economy and poor money management skills. >>> a senate committee is looking into possible solutionings to fixing the postal service problems
cocaine and now are we going to do wait until the baby gets into environment real neglect abuse in the eye of the law around a drug infested environment? i think it's terrible that she was able to keep this baby. >> bill: i agree with you. what is the why? why the five jurists the highest in the state of new jersey see it the other way and don't do anything literally nothing to this mother? why? dr. walsh? >> they don't do it because they say it's not a human yet. it's a fetus. >> bill: even when two days from being birthed? >> apparently you have to have a crack pipe in your mouth while you are in labor and keep it in your mouth as the baby is handed into your arms for anything to be done. >> bill: i don't know if it will be done then, but you see that little bit differently i understand? >> bill, the court absolutely got it right here. parents have a constitutional right to raise and maintain their kids without undue interference from the government. and the bottom line is that the division of youth services here showed four documents, bill. this was a travesty. we left this child alone
environment, like the shooting range like this one. but last saturday, when he brought former marine 25-year- old eddie ray roth to a shooting range, he turned his weapon kyle. >> three men arrived at the rough creek lodge around 3:15 p.m. on the day of the murder. around 5:00 p.m., hunting guide that works for rough creek came across the two men. they were unresponsive. apparent gunshot wounds. >> reporter: kyle moved back to texas to be with his family after leaving the navy seals in 2009. he became famous following his best-selling book, american sniper, where he describes his 150 confirmed kills, appearing on "the o'reilly factor." >> so you were committed to killing these people because you and your heart believed that they deserved to die. >> i wasn't so much committed to killing them as i was, i'm committed to making sure every service member that was over there, whether american or allied, came home. >> reporter: kyle paired with fitco cares foundation, a nonprofit providing life coaching to in-need veterans. his friend, chad littlefield, was also gunned down. the attorney claims his
that are better places to the entrepreneurs and others. >> we need to provide an environment that says we want you to do good business and create jobs but also going to support u.s. people in your own personal agendas to help your community and nation and someone. connell: what are you doing? >> united nations foundation made a commitment to entrepreneurs to help them stepped into not only their business but their philanthropy and using their technology and innovation to help solve global problems. connell: where are you making the most progress? are there surprising results? people would say go to the united states go to silicon valley there are plenty of entrepreneurs but are there other places where it is surprisingly you are seeing strong growth in entrepreneurs? >> in the development space is interesting, not just charity anymore but i am going to create some innovations that might save lives. if you look at malaria deaths have been cut in half in 11 countries in the last five years that is the cause technology of the long-lasting, entrepreneur created. connell: not just people throwing money
giving birth to try crack cocaine and now are we going to do wait until the baby gets into environment real neglect abuse in the eye of the law around a drug infested environment? i think it's terrible that she was able to keep this baby. >> bill: i agree with you. what is the why? why the five jurists the highest in the state of new jersey see it the other way and don't do anything literally nothing to this mother? why? dr. walsh? >> they don't do it because they say it's not a human yet. it's a fetus. >> bill: even when two days from being birthed? >> apparently you have to have a crack pipe in your mouth while you are in labor and keep it in your mouth as the baby is handed into your arms for anything to be done. >> bill: i don't know if it will be done then, but you see that little bit differently i understand? >> bill, the court absolutely got it right here. parents have a constitutional right to raise and maintain their kids without undue interference from the government. and the bottom line is that the division of youth services here showed four documents, bill. this was a trave
for environments where there's not a lot of resources. >> because so many competitors all around the world that's what they train for their whole lives. and to -- it's sad to think they would get rid of so many people's dreams of competing in the olympics. >> a dream he's not ready to give up. >>> a broken pipe on the peninsula has spent thousands of gallons of chlorinated water kills an estimated 400 fish. the small amount of chlorine in the water makes it safe to drink but it can be deadly to fish. they confirm fish kill include steel head trout. the san francisco euc says workers added chemicals and are releasing water upstream now to try to die lute the chlorine. >>> a disabled carnival cruise ship is slowly being towed to mobile alabama. it has had no running walter since sunday when the fire knock out power. more than 400 passengers are complaining about overflowing toilets and long lines for food. the ceo of carnival is apologizing for the conditions. it is expected to arrive in alabama late tomorrow or thursday. >>> reinventing government, a ktvu exclusive. >>> new visit -- video from
of sports are huge for environments where there's not a lot of resources. >> because so many competitors all around the world that's what they train for their whole lives. and to -- it's sad to think they would get rid of so many people's dreams of competing in the olympics. >> a dream he's not ready to give up. >>> a broken pipe on the peninsula has spent thousands of gallons of chlorinated water kills an estimated 400 fish. the small amount of chlorine in the water makes it safe to drink but it can be deadly to fish. they confirm fish kill include steel head trout. the san francisco euc says workers added chemicals and are releasing water upstream now to try to die lute the chlorine. >>> a disabled carnival cruise ship is slowly being towed to mobile alabama. it has had no running walter since sunday when the fire knock out power. more than 400 passengers are complaining about overflowing toilets and long lines for food. the ceo of carnival is apologizing for the conditions. it is expected to arrive in alabama late tomorrow or thursday. >>> reinventing government, a ktvu exclusive. >>> >>>
to texas. last week in a radio ad governor perry said texas offers a friendlier business environment than california. >>> 7:48. tomorrow night, president obama will deliver his first state of the union address of his second term. jamie dupree joins us via skype. what are you hearing about the focus of the president's state of the union address? >> reporter: the basic line out of officials from the white house the last couple of days has been that the president will focus on economic issues, job and the economy, still at the top of the list. but, of course, i would think, tori, that he will talk about a number of very detailed items like the ideas of gun and gun violence in the wake of the newtown, connecticut shootings, immigration reform issues and the budget cuts coming up on march -- march 1,the focus -- the -- march 1st. the focus the white house is saying the argument will be on economic issues. we'll see what happens tomorrow night. >> do you expect he will set a more conciliatory tone with republicans or will he still have that aggression tone at the inauguration address? >> report
bringing investigative reporting to the civil-rights story and the other is the fbi environment, killing, the meridian bombing, the attempted set up by the fbi that led to the arrest of tommy terence, murder in athens. tell me if you would the impact having that kind of news coverage on the movement had on sort of the national understanding of what was going on. >> we really understood the press as educational tv. everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on for 100 years. it was hard to get it out. because this is 1963, i was reminded that fred shuttlesworking to get martin luther king on the seventeenth of december to promise he would come to birmingham this year but that is because on the fourteenth or fifteenth fred's church had been bombed for the third time in 1962. there had been 16 bombings of homes that receive no publicity. fred shuttlesworth was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come over there to give intention to this in just this. one of my other good friends, a guy who had been with us in the movement from camera man, was quit
environment than california. >>> tomorrow night president obama delivers his state of the union address. the white house says the main theme will be so-called pocketbook issues. policies to help the middle class. now after the state of the union address, president obama will go to three different communities explaning his proposals. the president will go to ashville, north carolina on wednesday. atlanta georgia on thursday. and chicago on friday. >>> celebrations to mark the lunar new year are being held around the world. that's in china where buddhist monks tolled the bells. more than 35,000 people have signed a petition asking president obama to make the start of the lunar new year a national holiday. billions of people worldwide support the lunar new year which is a time to return home to visit family. here in san francisco china town will celebrate the year of the snake a week from saturday with a chinese new year parade. the parade which is known for the elaborate floats and costumes dates back to the 1860s. it is considered the largest celebration outside of asia. and you can watc
last year in what it termed a deteriorating environment for press freedom. the committee to protect journalists says 232 journalists were jailed last year, the highest number since surveying began in 1990. 70 journalists were killed in a line of duty, an increase of more than 40% from the previous year. a top native american leader is urging house lawmakers to reauthorize the violence against women act and follow tribal governments to prosecute non- native men who abuse women on tribal lands. jefferson kiel, president of the national congress of american indians, made the remarks thursday in the state of indian nations address. he said the death rate of native women on some reservations is 10 times the national average. nearly 60% of native women are married to non-native men, and according to justice department data, non-native men carry out 70% of reported rapes against native women. >> today, tribes to not have the authority to prosecute non- natives who beat, raped, or even kill women on tribal lands. state and federal authorities are often hundreds of miles away without the loc
.a. it is in orange county. it is a changing environment, but it is a wealthy, somewhat conservative community. one of the challenges i had was to make the library in a national institution while still respectful of local customs and that was not easy. >> so the foundation, the chairman is still ron walker. how would you describe -- you were very controversial you were about as controversial as any director. >> this is what -- i promised -- if you look at what i said from the beginning, from 2006 when the national archives hired me to do this, i was very straightforward about what i was going to do. so there is no debate in switching. the archives came to me. but it was a very interesting conflict of different events because the head of the nixon foundation at that point was john taylor, rev. john taylor. and john taylor is an intellectual. he is very complicated. he is a bit torn about nixon. and he admired nixon's mind. and he wanted nixon's library to be credible. now, i don't believe that every member of the nixon foundation shared john's intellectual goal. he really wanted the cold war histori
environment for children. remember the first pope to meet with victims of sex abuse which he did for the first time in the united states in april 2008 and did six times total over the course of his papacy, the first pope to apologize directly for the crisis to institute zero tolerance as the official policy of the church. critics will say much of that was too little too late. too much was left undone but that of course is not the only issue that people will remember about this pope. many liberals in the catholic church, for example, would praise him on some fronts but suggest overall his leadership rolled back the clock on the reforming spirit of the second vatican council in the mid 1960s. many women particularly religious women in the united states, nuns, willmember the crackdowns on american nuns that unfolded on his watch. while his admirers, i submit, will probably remember him as one of the great teaching popes of modern times perhaps of all time who for almost eight years led a sort of global graduate seminar about the relationship between reason and faith and the place of religion in a
on the mind the security environment of china. >> okay. so i think we will leave it there, but we appreciate your insight your experience. that was a former south korean foreign minister joining us on the line. spelling out exactly what could happen over the next couple days. we did touch on it there, the role that china could play. the united states will be looking toward beijing to take a leadership role because of the influence that the chinese have over their closest friends, the north koreans. but right now we will say good-bye to our viewers in the united states. but for everyone else here at cnn international, we'll continue on with our coverage of this breaking news story. let's go to matthew chance who is live in beijing. for more on this, it is the chinese new year holiday. the place is closed down, you can shoot a cannon down the main street of beijing and not hit anybody. when can we expect something to come out of the government there? >> it's very difficult to say. >> a war in the gop. between donald trump calling karl rove a total loser and the dualing responses to the state o
in the last hour, the suspect is contained in a physical environment. that makes it easier in a wooded area. safety is going to be first and foremost with time and effect on their side now. time is more on their side if it's believed that the suspect does not have captives or hostages with him. the speculation about the fire power, stay away from that. you have no idea what he has as far as weapon power at this junkture. the end story is never going to the story as the beginning story. the lack of information, there is speculation going on. the good news is if this is corner, he is in a contained situation. this will be a matter of time. >> you know, you make a good point there. this is good advice to stay away from, how much fire power he has. the emotional element. he went after two former guys, lapd officers. he named 4 others. he shot and kill a riverside police officer wounding another. now today in a recent shoot out, two deputies or officers shot and wounded. how emotional is this for these guys who have been searching for christopher corner for five days. they got it inside the cabi
is the right time to cut. maggie thatcher did it the midst of all environments, arguing that longer term gains would more than justify acute short term pay? >> real serious thing, government spending is taxation, it really is. government doesn't create resources, it redistributes resources. when you should cut unnecessary spending is in the middle of a recession. i know people will tell you it's not true, but it is true. you can't tax an economy out of a recession. you just plain can't. >> neil: and i wanted to get with this into melissa francis into this, whether the first report out of the treasury indicates the whisperings of that. you can't hang your hat on tax hikes and can't be hoping and praying important another internet boom? >> you can't. you have to do a low rate tax and free trade and minimal regulations and get out of the way. the economy will get it out of the sefgs. that is what it is supposed to do. governments aren't the job creators. they set the rules and set the stage and let the private sector handle it. it's unfortunately not what this guy is doing. i hope somewhere along
and hats and gloves and everything else, you couldn't survive in that environment outside. so he likely had to be inside some type of cabin, some type of location. and again realizing that if he was on foot, not only is he carrying 275 pounds of christopher dorner with him, but he's also carrying probably a backpack and multiple guns and ammunition. so he wasn't moving very fast very quickly or very far in those mountains. >> clint, do you think he's setting this up for suicide by cop now? >> i think if he could, he would have escaped from the mountain. but this is a smart guy. we can't take it away from him. and in his mind just like we're talking about various scenarios, he would have had various scenarios, too, of what to do when confronted. whether he would surrender. whether he would in his own mind fight to the death perhaps in a suicide by cop scenario. so he had just like any police officer or military officer, a number of different responses based on the situation. he's the one that will choose that response and again tonight, this afternoon and tonight, whether he lives or dies is
, which was that incident command posts will be a target rich environment. here he is holed up in an apartment that almost has a view directly on the command post on the other side of the road with a automatic sniper rifle with.50 caliber sniper bullets. so was that the first place he could find to get into? or two, did he choose it because it would give him an observation post and potentially a target. >> are you aware how far the broken down truck was from that location? >> i was told it's not that far away. this might have been the first place he encountered. about the search, because you asked about that, they would check houses and if there was any forced entry, they would go in and check that house to determine did that have anything to do with him, was he still there? if there were houses unlocked, they would check those. but where there was sign of no forced entry, that was a sign that this was in tact. they didn't make a forced entry to places already locked. so you could consider a scenario where he would have found an unlocked place or found a hidden key, made an ent
in the environment. essentially, the blind can see something again. >> one of the things i can do now is laundry. my husband had to put the colored clothes all together in a pile. with the glasses, i'm able to do that myself. >> reporter: kathy blake is 61 and has been blind for 23 years. but after a two-hour surgery, kathy has a new perspective. >> the glasses really help me be more outdoors, with mobility, walking. >> reporter: right now, the device is only approved for retinitis pigmentosa. complete vision loss. only about 100,000 people in the u.s. suffer from it. the device could be used to treat millions who can't see. >> i think that the future for this is going to be big. >> reporter: let's hope. and if you're wondering what sparked the doctor's interest in blindness? it turns out, his grandmother went blind. so, he devoted his entire career to finding a cure for this. >> how rewarding for him. 25 years later now. >> it's amazing. >> thanks, gio. appreciate it. >>> coming up on the broadcast, not only will we show you the sloth on the speedboat. the big question for "star wars" geeks. is har
in a much more urban environment or maybe it's fortunate. it is a very urban and compact environment. moving a lot of snow piles are going to require heavier equipment. >> reporter: governor asking all nonessential employees to stay home. a lot of businesses closed today, jon. the streets as i mentioned are relatively quiet. that is good thing as they try to clear the snow. jon: it is a heavy snow too. it is a lot of moisture in there. it is hard to dig out. >> reporter: but good for snowballs. jon: always finding a bright spot. rick leventhal in ham den, connecticut. jenna: a fox news alert for you boeing out to california where police are offering a one million dollar reward for information leading to the capture of christopher dorner, a name you are now familiar with. this is the former cop accused of killing three people and sparking a multi-state manhunt. william la jeunesse is live at l.a.p.d. headquarters with more on this story. william, police have up the ante. >> reporter: having declared war on the l.a.p.d. the department responded in kind this weekend, labeling him a domestic ter
go into that environment where everyone else is not maybe lined up with the way you believe and the way you think, after, you know, time, you could -- the stress could probably wear on you. i don't think it's in any way justifiable, someone going out and killing anyone because they're stressed out at work. there are ways and outlets of releasing stress. chris unfortunately was one of those people he bottled up a lot of his emotions and wasn't very good at expressing himself. >> he didn't have close friends? he didn't talk to his mom? >> i believe he did have a good relationship with his mother and some of his close friends, but even, i think, in the manifesto he lists how he just sort of alienated himself from everyone towards the end. >> did he think he was better than everyone else? that manifesto is so narcissistic, isn't it? >> completely. everything is i was always the best and somehow i was done wrong. >> i mentioned that yesterday. one time i think maybe sort of as a light note -- i kind of have to laugh about something in this or else it makes you a little crazy in y
the merits of the way he trains. ill he' say in the training environment, the reason it's not a public video when you're doing any kind of training it evokes a lot of emotions to people and in this case to diversity. at usda a big part of the work they're doing is working with migrant workers and populations in fact broadly minority and i think that that's important that exists. there's a reason by the way, fortune 500 companies invest in this training because it does impact the way a workplace environment works, there's data to support that. spending in in area is important giving the work they do. we can question his training style and what worked and didn't for you, but i think the value of it is inherent in the data that does exist out there. >> the business we should make them say-- referring it pilgrims as illegal aliens, illegal immigrants, get some pushback and people want them referred to as undocumented workers. it's interesting to see that federal taxpayers effectively taking a side by saying, you if you use the term illegal alien, it's racist, it's got, you know, it's completely
whatever environment they're in, we've got to take some accountability for their world. so being in this particular role and this particular place to me that's purposeful. but the surprise is that these young people are just like every other young person everywhere else. >> you say like every other young person. are they seeking guidance as well? the perception is that's not the case. >> it is a per seps. a lot of what's shaping the young people in john mcdonough's lives are perceptions. i find these young people to be extremely engaging, extremely inquisitive inquisitive. they have the staem hopes and aspirations as everyone else. they don't have the same beginnings, the same opportunities. there are a lot of obstacles that none of us have ever had to face. >> i've always believed if kids don't think you care they don't care what you think. you've had four principals in the last six years. are you staying? >> i'm staying. listen some of these kids the lives of these young people will be with me for the rest of my life. they have impacted me in ways that i never
, which is we live in a global competitive environment and this kind of stealing can leapfrog them ahead of us in business, in development, without having to spend the money or the capital for the research and development to get there. >> are they better at hacking than we are? >> no but they're not playing fair, and that's the key here. >> as with john miller i write down what he says. this is the cold war for the >>> and speaking of threats, there's a new threat to your credit rating. it's not identity threat but mistakes that somebody else is making that's affecting you. we'll show you why "60 minutes" covered it and tomorrow we'll speak with i remember the day my doctor said i had diabetes. there's a lot i had to do... watch my diet. stay active. start insulin... today, i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said that with novolog® flexpen® i don't have to use a syringe and a vial or carry a cooler. flexpen® comes prefilled with fast-acting insulin used to help control high blood sugar when you eat. dial the exact dose. inject by push
. whatever environment they're in we've got to take on a role. that's purposeful but the surprise is that these young people are just like every other young person everywhere else. >> you say like every other young person. are they seek guidance as well? ? >> it is the perception. sa lot a lot of what's saving them is i find them to be extremely engaging inquisitive. they have the same hopes and as pier ragss as everyone else. they don't have the same beginnings. they don't have the same opportunities. there are a lot of obstacles that many of these young people none of us have never had to face. >> i always believe if kids don't think you care they don't care what you think. and at your school it says four principals in the last six years. are you staying? >> i'm staying. listen. some of these kids the lives of these young people will be with me for the rest of my life. they have impacted me in ways i never expected. i think if you talked to my teachers they'd say the same. what i know is they need stability and continuity and right now we're seeing positive cha
in an effective way, what's also in a hostile environment. >> george weigel. great to get your perspective. i am sure you'll be watching for the white smoke as the rest of us will in the coming weeks. thanks so. . we'll have much more on the pope's decision this morning. >> right now natalie joins us with today's headlines good morning. >> good morning. officials say at least three people were so the in the newcastle county court in wilmington delaware. the mayor said the suspected gunman was dead and the man's wife was killed in the incident. two others were wounded. >>> a trail of destruction in mississippi after a powerful tornado tore through three counties. the weather channel's reynolds wolf is with the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. i want to show you something in hattiesburg. take a look at this church, mt. caramel baptist church which was full. of course the people left. the tornado struck in the afternoon. pan over here on this side. street and we'll show you all this damage we have right over here off main street. part of a gas station devastated. debris as far as yo
of environments, which makes him completely unfit to be the director of central intelligence. stephanie: let me review. instead of being the heads of the c.i.a., he should be executed into treason. we should turn that into a tribunal. >> that's what they peddle. stephanie: ok, let's end with linda harvey from mission america. what's that? >> one of those web radio shows that seems to be popular amongst the righties. >> he would cave in and allow homosexual identity and attraction to be respected and welcomed among their boys. that would mean mobile spiritual and possibly physical corruption, plain and simple. parents and grandparents in our nation are appalled at the irresponsibility of this potential move. the delay is not necessarily a good sign. what the national boy scouts may be hoping for is for more dialogue. in other words ways to pressure local troop leaders and national christian groups threatening to disaffiliate if this new policy goes through. the delay also allows homosexual groups to mount bigger nationwide campaigns to spin the issue as a matter of hate versus love and tolerance
is in there, how many bodies are in there. hopefully the environment is a little bit working to the advantage of the authorities. >> and also, chris -- >> go ahead. >> no, and also, chris, one of the other things, they do have the technology, even in these temperatures, to see heat signatures, these kind of things. the other thing, as nightfall approaches is night vision gear. law enforcement, i know that most tactical teams have night vision gear. does he have that capability? one of the other things, too, that we have to keep in mind. with social media the way it is right now, twitter, there's -- how many people does he subscribe to? does he subscribe to different media organizations in the los angeles area that are twittering what's going on in and around the cabin. that's something else that the media and other people involved in this situation have to be careful about what they put out, even in social media. >> you know, i was going to say, we're just getting sad news from the "l.a. times." unfortunately, one of the deputies who was airlifted to the loma linda medical center, we are now
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)